japanese-umbrella-maker-ann-miller

Image courtesy@Fine Art America

The shrill noise of the doorbell cut through my afternoon siesta, as I woke up with a start. As I looked around for my phone, I heard my 8 year old answer the door.  How fast they grow up! It seems only yesterday she was laid in my arms for the first time, in the private chamber of the hospital room. Ashish was fussing over her like a child with a shiny new toy, never for once realizing that she might not be his daughter.

I never told him how I met Indra 9 years ago in the conference in Mumbai, and how in a moment of passion I had exchanged my soul for love; love that I never got from Ashish. That night was one of the most glorious nights of my existence, as he washed away my loneliness with his Midas touch.

The next day brought rains and the desolation of unrequited love. As the moment for parting drew closer, he stood there in the rains with a sad smile upon his face. Without thinking, I gave him my umbrella and climbed into the cab that would carry me away from him forever.

She was still at the door; talking to god-knows-who in that chirpy little voice of hers. She always had me a little worried, with her strange and lonely ways. These days it was her most recent invention – her invisible friend, the umbrella man – an excuse for all the mischief she gets in, like coming home late from school and buying new toys without our knowledge. I guess it is time we talk to her about pocket money.

Wondering who is she talking to for so long, I called out to her, “who is it, Rashi?”

She came running to my room, out of breath and crying.

“It’s the umbrella man, mamma. He left, said he wouldn’t come again. He asked me to give this to you, said it is yours.”

“Do you know him, mamma? Will you ask him to come back?”

In her hands was the blue-checkered umbrella I had given to a lost soul many years ago in the streets of Mumbai.

—————————————————————————————————————————————————————–

U

So, U is for Umbrella Man – someone who gives shade without expecting anything in return. Much like the blogger I am about to feature today.

Madness of a Modern Writer

This website is an educational blog for aspiring writers (like me). Chris Votey’s blog might contain the madness of a writer, but there is a method to his madness. Brilliantly inspirational yet unusually elementary, his writing style would leave you wanting for more. His take on the A to Z challenge is to bombard you with literary terms that are quintessential to the fiction world.

If your world is surrounded by fiction, fantasy and untold stories and you are striving to bring them to the rest of us non-illuminated ones, this blog is a must visit. It would not only help you understand the different facets of a literary composition but also teach you to create your own fantasy world in photoshop, so that you already have your own map before starting out to become the next Tolkien or Martin.

Here is an excerpt from his blog:

Dénouement & Deus Ex Machina

Dénouement is French, meaning unknotting or unwinding. It comes at the end of a story, after the end of the conflict, generally regarded as the last scene of the story. Often times the author wants to close this scene out as fast as possible, and generally is the shortest element in the book.

But what is it? In simplistic term, it is what happens after the resolution of the story. Once the character has achieve what they needed, it is the little bit of story remaining, which also can be indication that there is still more story to tell, as in the case of a sequel

Go check it out and while you are at it, don’t forget to click on the link: Not my Duck. Definitely worth a read.